Orplid

Orplid has been described as "less a song than an incantation." Indeed, no other word suffices for this enchanted and enchanting evocation of the mythical isle of Orplid as conjured by its guardian goddess, Weylas
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isleoforplid@gmail.com

Salvador Dali - ‘Galatea of the Spheres’
Galatea of the Spheres is a painting by Salvador Dalí made in 1952. It depicts Gala Dalí, Salvador Dalí’s wife and muse, as pieced together through a series of spheres. The name Galatea refers to a sea nymph of Classical mythology renowned for her virtue, and may also refer to the statue beloved by its creator, Pygmalion.
Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy Trioson (French,1767-1824) - 'Pygmalion and Galatea' 1819
The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue
'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.
-8-
Thus like a queen array’d, so richly dress’d, Beauteous she shew’d, but naked shew’d the best. Then, from the floor, he rais’d a royal bed, With cov’rings of Sydonian purple spread: The solemn rites perform’d, he calls her bride, With blandishments invites her to his side; And as she were with vital sense possess’d, Her head did on a plumy pillow rest.

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roussy Trioson (French,1767-1824) - 'Pygmalion and Galatea' 1819

The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue

'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.

-8-

Thus like a queen array’d, so richly dress’d,
Beauteous she shew’d, but naked shew’d the best.
Then, from the floor, he rais’d a royal bed,
With cov’rings of Sydonian purple spread:
The solemn rites perform’d, he calls her bride,
With blandishments invites her to his side;
And as she were with vital sense possess’d,
Her head did on a plumy pillow rest.

Recreating Pygmalion’s Galatea: 'How to Create the Perfect Wife'
Thomas Day is the ultimate 18th century misogynist.  He was also an abolitionist, philanthropist, Rousseau obsessive, and a famous children’s writer. He expected in a wife more than the average Georgian male desired in every paragon of womanhood he could possibly meet. Instead of virtue and social poise, he wanted a precise definition of perfection, and despite chancing on the only woman in the world who could give it to him, he was never satisfied with her.
As Wendy Moore recounts in her delightful book, ‘How to Create The Perfect Wife,’ Thomas Day’s adventure begins with a harebrained idea, borne of dejection after a disastrous betrothal, to mold a child into his future wife.  He wanted his Sophie, the virtuous, frugal, and faithfully abiding wife to Rousseau’s Emile, and like Moore suggests, set about recreating Pygmalion’s Galatea.

Recreating Pygmalion’s Galatea: 'How to Create the Perfect Wife'

Thomas Day is the ultimate 18th century misogynist.  He was also an abolitionist, philanthropist, Rousseau obsessive, and a famous children’s writer. He expected in a wife more than the average Georgian male desired in every paragon of womanhood he could possibly meet. Instead of virtue and social poise, he wanted a precise definition of perfection, and despite chancing on the only woman in the world who could give it to him, he was never satisfied with her.

As Wendy Moore recounts in her delightful book, ‘How to Create The Perfect Wife,’ Thomas Day’s adventure begins with a harebrained idea, borne of dejection after a disastrous betrothal, to mold a child into his future wife.  He wanted his Sophie, the virtuous, frugal, and faithfully abiding wife to Rousseau’s Emile, and like Moore suggests, set about recreating Pygmalion’s Galatea.

Étienne Maurice Falconet - 'Pygmalion & Galatee' 1763
The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue
'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.
-7-
Adds orient pearls, which from the conchs he drew, And all the sparkling stones of various hue: And parrots, imitating human tongue, And singing-birds in silver cages hung: And ev’ry fragrant flow’r, and od’rous green, Were sorted well, with lumps of amber laid between: Rich fashionable robes her person deck, Pendants her ears, and pearls adorn her neck: Her taper’d fingers too with rings are grac’d, And an embroider’d zone surrounds her slender waste.

Étienne Maurice Falconet - 'Pygmalion & Galatee' 1763

The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue

'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.

-7-

Adds orient pearls, which from the conchs he drew,
And all the sparkling stones of various hue:
And parrots, imitating human tongue,
And singing-birds in silver cages hung:
And ev’ry fragrant flow’r, and od’rous green,
Were sorted well, with lumps of amber laid between:
Rich fashionable robes her person deck,
Pendants her ears, and pearls adorn her neck:
Her taper’d fingers too with rings are grac’d,
And an embroider’d zone surrounds her slender waste.

Herbert Schmalz - 'L'Eveil de Galatée'-'The Awakening of Galatea'
The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue
'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.
-6-
And straining hard the statue, was afraid His hands had made a dint, and hurt his maid: Explor’d her limb by limb, and fear’d to find So rude a gripe had left a livid mark behind: With flatt’ry now he seeks her mind to move, And now with gifts (the pow’rful bribes of love), He furnishes her closet first; and fills The crowded shelves with rarities of shells; 

Herbert Schmalz - 'L'Eveil de Galatée'-'The Awakening of Galatea'

The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue

'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.

-6-

And straining hard the statue, was afraid
His hands had made a dint, and hurt his maid:
Explor’d her limb by limb, and fear’d to find
So rude a gripe had left a livid mark behind:
With flatt’ry now he seeks her mind to move,
And now with gifts (the pow’rful bribes of love),
He furnishes her closet first; and fills
The crowded shelves with rarities of shells; 

Jean-Leon Gérôme - 'Pygmalion and Galatea'
The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue
'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.
-5-
But when, retiring back, he look’d again, To think it iv’ry, was a thought too mean: So wou’d believe she kiss’d, and courting more, Again embrac’d her naked body o’er; …
Robert Graves (English,1895-1985) - 'Galatea and Pygmalion'
Paul Delvaux (Belgian, 1897-1994) - 'Pygmalion' 20th c
The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue
'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.
-4-
The flesh, or what so seems, he touches oft, Which feels so smooth, that he believes it soft. Fir’d with this thought, at once he strain’d the breast, And on the lips a burning kiss impress’d.‘Tis true, the harden’d breast resists the gripe, And the cold lips return a kiss unripe:
Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827 ) - 'Modern Pygmalion'
The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue
'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.
-3-
One wou’d have thought she cou’d have stirr’d, but strove With modesty, and was asham’d to move. Art hid with art, so well perform’d the cheat, It caught the carver with his own deceit: He knows ’tis madness, yet he must adore, And still the more he knows it, loves the more:
Creating his ‘Galatea’ …..
The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue
'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.
-2-
And carv’d in iv’ry such a maid, so fair, As Nature could not with his art compare, Were she to work; but in her own defence Must take her pattern here, and copy hence. Pleas’d with his idol, he commends, admires, Adores; and last, the thing ador’d, desires. A very virgin in her face was seen, And had she mov’d, a living maid had been:

Creating his ‘Galatea’ …..

The Story of Pygmalion and the Statue

'Metamorphoses' by Ovid, written 1 A.C.E.

-2-

And carv’d in iv’ry such a maid, so fair,
As Nature could not with his art compare,
Were she to work; but in her own defence
Must take her pattern here, and copy hence.
Pleas’d with his idol, he commends, admires,
Adores; and last, the thing ador’d, desires.
A very virgin in her face was seen,
And had she mov’d, a living maid had been: